“We Take Apart the very First Instants of Destruction and Use Them
to Make the World a Safer Place.”

HEMI News

Dr. Kit H. Bowen, Jr. of Department of Chemistry Joins HEMI Faculty

We would like to welcome Dr. Kit Hansell Bowen, Jr. as a new HEMI faculty member. An E. Emmet Reid...

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Kenneth Livi of the Materials Characterization and Processing Facility joins HEMI

Please join us in welcoming Dr. Kenneth Livi from the Department of Materials Science & Engineering as a new member of...

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Dr. Noam R. Izenberg of The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Joins HEMI

We welcome Dr. Noam Izenberg from The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory as a new member of HEMI, effective immediately....

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HAVE AN EXTREME QUESTION?

Curious about what happens when worlds collide? What about why an athlete gets a concussion from some hits, but not others? Go ahead: Ask a HEMI expert!

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You asked. We answered.

Here are a few of the other questions that have been submitted to our experts.


  • Q:

    I'm interested in learning more about impact forces. Can you describe what kind of forces HEMI investigates?

    A:

    We investigate impact forces and conditions akin to the pressures seen deep within planets, or at the tip of a bullet hitting a bullet-proof vest, or when a meteoroid enters the Earth's atmosphere, or during the eruption of a major volcano.

  • Q:

    What is HEMI?

    A:

    The Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute (HEMI) is an institute dedicated to understanding materials and structures under extreme conditions, and to giving people a way to think about the difficult problems that arise in extreme events. HEMI researchers partner with academic, government, and private organizations to build the basic science needed to address threats and opportunities of the future while also providing the tools needed to address the problems of today.

  • Q:

    I'm interested in joining the HEMI team. What do I need to do?

    A:

    If you are a student or postdoctoral fellow, you'll need to apply through either the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering or the Kreiger School of Arts & Sciences. More detailed instructions can be found on our 'Work with HEMI' page.

  • Q:

    I'm not quite sure what you mean by extreme materials and environments. Can you clarify?

    A:

    Extreme materials are materials that are extraordinary in their ability to perform some function (e.g., extraordinarily hard and light). Extreme environments are extraordinarily high pressures, temperatures, energy densities, and strain rates that result from the deposition of large energies into small spaces. Examples include the conditions just under an asteroid impact on a planet, during an aircraft crash, or within the human brain under rapid accelerations (leading, for example, to concussions).

  • Q:

    Why was HEMI created?

    A:

    HEMI was created to bring groups of scholars together to solve the complex problems that are usually avoided because of their difficulty, and to teach people a way to think about such problems. An analogy can be made between extreme environments and a very bright flash of light: most people close their eyes to avoid seeing the flash, while HEMI creates new ways of looking at the event so that you can actually see what made the flash in the first place.