HEMI Fellow Muyinatu Bell receives 2021 SPIE Early Career Achievement Award – Academic Focus

Congratulations to HEMI Fellow Muyinatu Bell, an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and director of the Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Systems Engineering (PULSE) Lab, or receiving the 2021 SPIE Early Career Achievement Award – Academic Focus.

Bell is internationally recognized for her pioneering work. Her research interests are in medical imaging technology, specifically ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging, photoacoustic-guided surgery, robot-assisted imaging, machine learning for image formation, and other cutting-edge techniques created to significantly advance healthcare interventions and diagnosis.

The international society for optics and photonics (SPIE) awards the SPIE Early Career Achievement Award – Academic Focus to recognize those in academia who have made significant and innovative technical contributions in fields of relevance to SPIE. Recipients’ contributions must have been made within the first five years of a post-training faculty appointment.

Read more about the SPIE Early Career Achievement Award here.

Three HEMI Fellows receive 2020 Johns Hopkins Discovery Awards

Congratulations to HEMI Fellows Tamás Budavári, Sarah Hörst, and Soojung Claire Hur, whose faculty teams each received a 2020 Johns Hopkins Discovery Award!

Professor Budavári is an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics. His team (made up of professors from the Whiting School of Engineering, the School of Medicine, and the Bloomberg School of Public Health) will study the “Lifesaving Breath: AI-driven Continuous Tidal Volume Monitoring Using Accelerometers & Gyroscopes.”

Professor Hörst is an assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. The topic of her team (made of professors from the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences and the Whiting School of Engineering) is “Calibrating the Sulfur Isotope Record to Investigate the Environmental Consequences of Varying Organic Matter Sources.”

Professor Hur is the Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Her team (made up of professors from the Whiting School of Engineering and the School of Medicine) will investigate the “Development of a Fluidic-based Approach for Purifying Human Stem Cell-derived Retinal Cells for Retinal Transplantation.”

The Johns Hopkins Discovery Awards program provides grant awards to cross-divisional teams, comprised of members from at least two schools or affiliates of the university, who are poised to arrive at important discoveries or creative works.

The program is meant to encourage collaboration across academic disciplines and divisions under the belief that the most challenging questions cannot be answered entirely by one discipline alone. These awards are expected to spark new, synergistic interactions between investigators across the institution and lead to work of the highest quality and impact. Recipients of the award are celebrated at an event each fall.

Learn more about the award and its recipients here.

Congratulations again to our HEMI awardees!

 

Prof. Stavros Gaitanaros, Prof. Emmy Smith, and Dr. Feng Zhu Selected as 2020 HEMI Seed Grant Awardees

Congratulations to the recipients of the 2020 HEMI Seed Grants: Prof. Stavros Gaitanaros, Prof. Emmy Smith and Dr. Feng Zhu!

Gaitanaros is a HEMI Fellow, assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Systems Engineering and principal investigator of the Extreme Mechanics of Architected Materials Group. His accepted proposal is titled “Crushing of Architected Materials and Phase Transitions.”

Smith is a HEMI Fellow, assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and principal investigator of the Smith Group. Her accepted proposal is titled “Were there extreme climate conditions at the dawn of modern animal life?”

Zhu is an associate research professor and Fellow within HEMI. His accepted proposal is titled “Data-driven Modeling of Dynamic Failure Behavior of Lithium-ion Batteries for Electric Vehicles.”

Each HEMI Seed Grant awards $25,000 to each recipient for the effective award period of January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2021. They are given each year to fund research in fundamental science associated with materials and structures under extreme conditions. All faculty and researchers at the Johns Hopkins University, as well as Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) staff, who can serve as Principal and Co-Investigators are eligible to apply. Learn more about the program here.

Sabine Stanley and Morgan Trexler Appointed to HEMI Executive Committee

Congratulations to Sabine Stanley and Morgan Trexler, who have been appointed as new members of the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute (HEMI) Executive Committee.

Stanley is a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor in the Johns Hopkins Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. Her research involves understanding planetary interior processes and evolution. She focuses on planetary magnetic fields, dynamo theory, interior structure models and other geophysical methods to learn about the deep interiors of planets. Her work includes projects on many solar system bodies (Mercury, Moon, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, asteroids and planetesimals) as well as extrasolar planets. She uses a combination of numerical simulations, theory and comparison to observations from various missions to explore her science questions.

Trexler is a Materials Engineer at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Her research interests include high rate impact mechanics, armor, biomechanics, and multifunctional and expeditionary materials. She received her PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. In 2014, she won the Outstanding Young Engineer award from the Maryland Academy of Sciences.

The HEMI Executive Committee exercises general responsibility over the activities within the Institute, considers major issues and makes recommendations to the Director. The Executive Committee establishes policies and procedures consistent with the goals of the HEMI mission. It meets monthly.

Learn more about the HEMI Executive committee here.

Somnath Ghosh named Fellow of The Mineral, Metals, and Materials Society

HEMI is pleased to congratulate Somnath Ghosh – HEMI Fellow, director of the Computational Mechanics Research Laboratory, and M. G. Callas Chair Professor in the Department of Civil and Systems Engineering at Johns Hopkins University – for being named a Fellow of The Mineral, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS).

Ghosh’s research is on computational mechanics with a focus on materials modeling, multi-scale structure-materials analysis and simulations, multi-physics modeling and simulation of multi-functional materials, materials characterization, process modeling, and emerging fields like Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME).

Fellows of TMS are recognized for their outstanding contributions to the practice of metallurgy, materials science, and technology; Fellows must have been members of TMS for at least five continuous years prior to receiving the award.

Learn more about The Mineral, Metals, and Materials Society’s Fellow Award here.

HEMI Fellow Sarah Hörst Receives James B. Macelwane Medal by the American Geophysical Union

HEMI is pleased to congratulate Sarah Hörst – HEMI Fellow, principal investigator at the Hörst Group and assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University – for being awarded the James B. Macelwane Medal by the American Geophysical Union.

Hörst is interested in atmospheric chemistry, specifically the complex organic chemistry that occurs in the atmosphere of Titan, one of Saturn’s moons. She is also interested in complex organics elsewhere in the solar system and the universe, whether they are produced in an atmosphere or on a surface.

The James B. Macelwane Medal is awarded to three to five researchers who have made significant contributions to Earth and space science; nominees must be within 10 years from their PhD at the time of nomination.

Read more about the James B. Macelwane Medal here.

HEMI Fellow Jaafar El-Awady Identifies New Method to Predict Cracks in Metal Before They Are Visible

Congratulations to Jaafar El-Awady, HEMI Fellow and associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, for discovering a new method to predict cracks in metal before they appear. His results were published in Science.

His paper, titled “The heterogeneity of persistent slip band nucleation and evolution in metals at the micrometer scale,” identifies a new method to test metals and predict vulnerabilities before visible cracks are formed. This has implications in understanding and predicting the life of a metal mechanism, especially to help prevent fatigue failure and to avoid discarding parts that may still be useful.

“We’re able now to have a more fundamental understanding about what leads up to cracks,” El-Awady said. “The practical implication is that it will allow us to understand and predict when or how the material is going to fail.”

Read El-Awady’s paper here.

HEMI Fellow Emmy Smith Receives 2021 James Wilson Award by the Society for Sedimentary Geology

Congratulations to Emmy Smith – HEMI Fellow, principal investigator at the Smith lab and assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University – for being awarded the 2021 James Wilson Award by the Society for Sedimentary Geology.

Smith is interested in the co-evolution of life, climate, oceans, and tectonics during the Neoproterozoic and Cambrian periods. Her research is focused on testing hypotheses about mechanistic links between environmental change and evolutionary milestones at field sites around the world.

The James Wilson Award is awarded to researchers who have significant research accomplishments in sedimentary geology; nominees must be between 0-5 years from their PhD at the time of nomination. There is no citizenship requirement, nor professional organization membership requirement, for recipients of the award.

Learn more about the James Wilson Award here.

HEMI Graduate Student Jenna Krynicki Receives 2020 National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship

Congratulations to Jenna Krynicki, graduate student in the Weihs group at HEMI and in the Department of Material Sciences and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, for being awarded a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship.

Jenna is currently examining the microstructural evolution of magnesium alloys after processing for lightweight structural and armor applications. She will continue her work under HEMI Fellow and professor in the Department of Material Sciences and Engineering, Timothy Weihs.

“When I found out that I was awarded the NDSEG Fellowship, I was incredibly stunned and excited! I am honored and very grateful to have received this fellowship and am pleased to now have the opportunity to expand the scope of my research. I would like to acknowledge the incredible support that I have received from my advisor Professor Tim Weihs and from those in my department here at Johns Hopkins. Thank you to all!” she said.

The NDSEG is a competitive and prestigious fellowship that is awarded to United States citizens, nationals, and dual citizens who intend to pursue a Doctoral degree in designated research disciplines. The fellowship provides support for three years and is sponsored by the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Air Force.

Learn more about the NDSEG fellowship here.