Extreme Arts Summer Project Final Presentations

Join us as we celebrate the completion of projects by our 2019 HEMI/MICA summer program participants!

Laila Milevski (Illustration Practice) worked with Prof. Thomas Gernay (Dept. of Civil Engineering) to create a pamphlet series related to different aspects of fire engineering, as well as a stop-motion animation centered on the experience of wildfire and losing one’s home.

Mae Rowland (Interdisciplinary Sculpture) worked with Prof. Susanna Thon (Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering) on the nature of physics and light in the scope of computational modeling and digital 3D rendering.

Yi Zheng (Illustration) worked with Prof. Sabine Stanley (Dept. of Earth & Planetary Sciences) on creating illustrations and animations related to planetary magnetic fields and interior structure models.

Presentations will take place in Malone Hall, Room G33/35.

Symmetry & Fracture: Works by Jenna Frye

HEMI research asks fascinating questions about what happens to materials under extreme conditions. Much of HEMI research can’t be perceived without powerful scanning technologies, let alone touched. Touch and perception, however, are both essential to how artists and designers learn and understand the world.

Symmetry & Fracture offers a way to physically connect with the complex research ideas of HEMI labs through hands-on exploration of mineral crystal systems and the grain boundaries of metallic materials.

You are invited to playfully investigate and decide for yourself where or if boundaries lie between art and science.

Extreme Materials and Conditions: Common Ground between Art and Science Gallery Reception

Extreme Materials and Conditions: Common Ground between Art and Science by Jay Gould, 2017 HEMI/MICA Extreme Arts Program Artist in Residence

A capstone exhibition of works developed over a one-year residency with the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute

Milton S. Eisenhower Library, Q Level
3400 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218

Artist Talk 5:30 – 6 PM

Extreme is a word often used to consider the outermost limits. We strive to find the boundaries of our existence, yet we assume that those bounds can always be pushed further. This exhibition of photographs and sculptural works uses analogy and storytelling to playfully describe how HEMI is pushing the extreme boundaries of materials, time, and scale through their research. The audience is invited to consider the imagination required to observe and test a world that is so far beyond our given, natural senses.

HEMI Seminar: Nasr M. Ghoniem

Development of Micro-Architected Materials for Space Propulsion and Pulsed Power Applications

Nasr M. Ghoniem, University of California, Los Angeles

Advances in electrode, chamber, and structural materials will enable breakthroughs in future generations of electric propulsion and pulsed power (EP & PP) technologies. Although wide ranges of electric propulsion and pulsed power technologies have witnessed rapid advances during the past few decades, much of the progress was based on empirical development of materials through experimentation and trial-and-error approaches. To enable future technologies and to furnish the foundations for quantum leaps in performance metrics of these systems, a science-based materials development effort is required. We aim to develop new plasma-resilient material architectures that will enable future generations of electric propulsion and pulsed power technologies through an integrated research approach that combines multiscale modeling of plasma-material interactions, experimental validation, and material characterization. The range of materials of interest in EP & PP include refractory metals, such as tungsten and its alloys (W-Re) and molybdenum, ceramic composites, such as BN and Al2O3, high-strength copper alloys, and carbon-carbon composites. These classes of materials serve various design functions; primarily in cathode and anode applications, in accelerator grids, and in beam dumps of HPM sources. The presentation will give a review of our fundamental understanding for the limits of using these materials in EE & PP, and the opportunity to design material architectures that may dramatically improve their performance. We discuss the results of recent research related to three questions: (1) How can we control the thermomechanical response of materials in extreme heat flux and mitigate failure? (2) What are the phenomena that determine the unstable erosion of material surfaces in plasma and ion environments? and (3) How can we design materials that beneficially influence the plasma through Secondary Electron Emission (SEE)? We first review the status of our experimental facilities for simulation of the space environment. Then, we present results of our understanding of the thermomechanics of materials in severe pulsed plasma environments, and the factors that control the erosive instabilities of surfaces. Finally, results of the effects of surface architectures on secondary electron emission will be given.

Seminar will be held at 11:00 AM in Malone Hall, G33/35.

 

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HEMI/MICA Extreme Arts Open House

HEMI/MICA Extreme Arts Open House
Light refreshments will be provided

Location: Malone Hall, Homewood Campus of Johns Hopkins University

The Open House provides an opportunity for Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) faculty to learn about each other’s research interests and explore potential synergies. Possible mutual areas of interest may include but are not limited to:

  • Data visualization
  • Interpretation, translation, and/or effective communication of large amounts of data
  • Response to research regarding HEMI ‘extreme’ events, collaborations, interdependent systems through:
    • Storyboarding and narrative
    • Animation
    • Photography
    • Graphic Design and graphics
    • Interactive arts or products
    • Games
    • Information visualization
    • Illustration
    • Drawing
    • Painting
    • Sculptural forms or materials

At the Open House, we will be announcing a residency program at HEMI for an artist or designer for Fall 2015 semester. This proposal-based opportunity encourages JHU and MICA faculty to team together to explore new approaches and provide new perspectives to HEMI-related research and themes.

The event is free, but registration, providing some basic information and images, is expected by April 6, 2015. The registration data will be available to participants at the Open House to support collaboration and shared dialog at the event. Any submissions after April 6th will not be included in the Open House.

Images and information submitted  at registration will be used for display and a program distributed at the event as well as for publicity surrounding the Open House.

Click here to register if you are a MICA faculty member/student. Registration will request the following items:

  • Contact information
  • Artist/Designer statement and/or research interests
  • Personal website URL for your practice and/or research
  • Upload of up to three images (jpeg format preferred, 300 dpi) which will be displayed during the Open House

Click here to register if you are a JHU faculty member/researcher. Registration will request the following items:

  • Contact information
  • Research interests
  • Personal website URL for your research
  • Upload of up to three images (jpeg format preferred, 300 dpi) which will be displayed during the Open House

If you have any questions, please contact Ms. Bess Bieluczyk, [email protected] and (410) 516-7794.

Information for attendees:

If you are traveling by car, visitor parking is available in the South Garage. If you are using a GPS system for directions, the best address to use in 3101 Wyman Park Drive.

Malone Hall (#43 on the map) is located between Mason Hall and Hackerman Hall on the Johns Hopkins University campus.

HEMI/MechE Seminar: “Multi-Scale Experimental Investigations for Characterization of Impact Response of Advanced Transparent Materials”

Subhash Seminar 4-6-15