HEMI hosts workshop with Sandia National Laboratories focusing on materials under extreme conditions

 HEMI co-sponsored a workshop with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on Thursday, September 1 . The workshop, held on the Homewood campus, focused on energetic materials, non-destructive testing, planetary science, AI for materials design, hypervelocity impact, fire science diagnostics, and the use of X-ray imaging techniques to characterize materials. Sandia representatives also shared an overview of their large-scale facilities. 

Sessions were chaired by HEMI Fellows June Wicks, assistant professor in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Jaafar El-Awady, professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Whiting School of Engineering. 

Representatives from Sandia included Sarah Stair, Scott Alexander, and Caroline Winters. The visitors from Sandia also met individually with Johns Hopkins graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to outline research internship opportunities at SNL.

 

SNL representatives (left to right): Caroline Winters, Scott Alexander, and Sarah Stair.  

HEMI leaders join other JHU experts to brief Congress and the public on artificial intelligence on July 28

From self-parking cars to digital assistants such as Siri and Alexa, artificial intelligence is an integral part of many people’s daily lives. But experts say we have only just begun to explore AI’s power to transform and improve lives in areas including health care, transportation, public health, education, climate change, and more.

From 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. EDT on Thursday, July 28, in the next installment of Johns Hopkins Congressional Briefing Series, AI experts from Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, School of Medicine, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Berman Institute of Bioethics will offer their insights into the opportunities and challenges presented by AI. These every-other-month briefings offer policymakers, their staff, and the public the chance to hear top experts’ views on important and relevant topics, such as gun violence, maternal health, and COVID-19. Registration is required, and attendees can submit questions in advance or during the briefing, which will be livestreamed here.

The session, titled “Artificial Intelligence: Opportunities and Challenges,” will be moderated by KT Ramesh, Alonzo G. Decker Jr. Professor of Science and Engineering, director of the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute, and senior advisor for AI to Johns Hopkins University President Ronald Daniels.

“At Johns Hopkins, we are bringing together two powerful forces, human intelligence and artificial intelligence, with the goal of understanding and improving the human condition,” Ramesh said. “The power of AI is at work in everything from autonomous technologies such as self-driving cars and robotic spacecraft to technologies that help us understand disease mechanisms and deliver better healthcare to patients. In this briefing, our experts will discuss the promise of AI, its impact, the ethical issues surrounding its use, and much more.”

Johns Hopkins experts participating are:

MEDE CRA Completes 10th Annual Fall Meeting

The Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments Collaborative Research Alliance (MEDE CRA) conducted its tenth and final Fall Meeting on November 17th, 2021. As the lead research organization of the CRA, Johns Hopkins University (JHU) hosts the event. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, this event was held using a virtual format.

The Fall Meeting brings the entire MEDE CRA together for a program overview and technical discussions in preparation for the January 2022 capstone event. This year’s Fall Meeting was attended by 117 individuals including special guests from the DEVCOM Army Research Laboratory (ARL), DEVCOM Soldier Center, United Kingdom’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Command,  and the National Ground Intelligence Center. Professor Lori Graham-Brady (JHU) and Dr. Sikhanda Satapathy (ARL) led the meeting, which highlighted the research accomplishments for new metallic, ceramic, and composite protection materials, as well as new computational design codes and tools for armor applications. Dr. Scott Schoenfeld, ARL’s Senior Research Scientist for Terminal Ballistics provided keynote remarks. The meeting also featured a virtual poster session with 41 presenters from across the MEDE CRA.

The MEDE CRA is an integral part of the ARL’s Enterprise for Multiscale Research of Materials. The objective of the MEDE CRA is to develop the capability to design, optimize, and fabricate material systems exhibiting revolutionary performance in extreme dynamic environments. The approach is to realize a mechanism-based, “materials-by-design” capability that focuses on advancing the fundamental understanding of materials in relevant high-strain-rate and high-stress regimes. Model materials in the areas of metals, ceramics, and composites are being investigated to improve protection for soldiers and vehicles.

CMEDE Fall Meeting Highlights Research by HEMI Fellows

The Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments Collaborative Research Alliance (MEDE CRA) conducted its Fall Meeting on October 15th, 2020. As the lead research organization of the CRA, Johns Hopkins University hosts and staffs the event. Due to COVID-19, the annual, closed event was completely virtual this year.

The MEDE Fall Meeting brings the entire MEDE CRA together for program overviews, collaborative activities, and discussion. In 2020, the event was attended by 130 individuals including special guests from the United Kingdom’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Army CCDC Army Research Laboratory, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the U.S. Army CCDC Soldier Center, the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Command,  the Office of Naval Research, and the National Ground Intelligence Center. Professor K.T. Ramesh (JHU) and Dr. Sikhanda Satapathy (CCDC ARL) led the meeting, which highlighted the research accomplishments for new metallic, ceramic, and composite protection materials, as well as new computational design codes and tools for armor applications. The meeting also featured a virtual poster session with 55 presenters including ARL researchers, university faculty, graduate students, and postdocs from within the MEDE CRA.

The MEDE Fall Meeting highlights research from partners around the world.

Application Period Open for 2020 Professional Development Workshop in Ceramics

The 2020 Professional Development Workshop in Ceramics will be held on June 4-5, 2020 on the campus of Johns Hopkins University. The purpose of this workshop is to provide career-development opportunities for selected early-career faculty in the area of ceramics science and engineering, while also strengthening the ceramics community through networking interactions among all participants. The workshop will also facilitate a broader discussion on emerging research areas in ceramics science and engineering.

The workshop will feature technical presentations from recent CAREER awardees in the National Science Foundation Ceramics Program, feedback from expert panelists on research and scholarship, and panel discussions led by experts on a variety of topics, including mentoring success stories, managing a research group, identifying and avoiding unconscious bias, navigating the tenure track, and a facilitated discussion of the future of ceramics research and education.

We encourage the participation of interested early-career researchers. There are limited spots available, so please fill out the application as soon as possible, and no later than April 17, 2020. Travel grants are available to cover part or all of the travel expenses for selected early-career researchers.

Please apply to attend the workshop at the following link:

https://forms.gle/oRH3GCtaz8zPsypY6

Questions? Contact Matthew McDowell at [email protected].

Leaders from the U.S. Army Review Research Completed Within CMEDE Program

In January 2020, the Enterprise for Multiscale Research of Materials, or EMRM, conducted its biennial Research Management Board (RMB) review at Johns Hopkins University.

The EMRM is comprised of the Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments, known as MEDE, and Multi-Scale Modeling of Electronic Materials, or MSME, collaborative research alliances who work with U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory’s internal energetics program. The MEDE and MSME CRAs are led by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Utah respectively, and include a consortium of over 20 universities.

The RMB review focused on scientific discoveries in the areas of electronic and protection materials. Currently, the enterprise is studying such electronic materials as electrochemical energy devices, hybrid photonic materials and heterogeneous electronics. Protection materials under investigation include metals, ceramics and composites for military armor applications.

The event was chaired by Dr. Alexander Kott, ARL’s chief scientist. The 16-member board included senior executives and senior research scientists from ARL, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology), U.S. Army CCDC Armaments Center, U.S. Army CCDC Chemical Biological Center, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Command, and representatives from the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation

More than 80 people participated in the meeting, including principal investigators and students from consortium universities, and ARL researchers.

Protection Materials Research Showcased by HEMI Fellows at MEDE Fall Meeting

The Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments Collaborative Research Alliance (MEDE CRA) conducted its Fall Meeting on October 17th, 2019. As lead research organization of the CRA, Johns Hopkins University hosts and staffs the event. Fourteen HEMI Fellows are part of the MEDE CRA.

The MEDE Fall Meeting is an annual, closed event that brings the entire MEDE CRA together for program overviews, collaborative activities, and discussion. In 2019, the event was attended by 120 individuals including special guests from the United Kingdom’s Defence Science and Technology Laboratory; the U.S. Army CCDC Soldier Center; the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Command; Office of Naval Research and the National Ground Intelligence Center. Professor K.T. Ramesh (JHU) and Dr. Sikhanda Satapathy (CCDC ARL) led the meeting, which focused on technical collaboration across the alliance and program planning for the upcoming year. Research accomplishments for new protection materials as well as new computational design codes and tools for armor applications were showcased through presentations and posters.

The meeting also provided the opportunity to thank Dr. John Beatty, former MEDE cooperative agreement manager, who retired recently. The group presented Beatty with an official note from the CCDC ARL’s Director of the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate and a letter of recognition from Dean Ed Schlesinger of the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering.

The MEDE CRA is an integral part of ARL’s Enterprise for Multiscale Research of Materials. The objective of the MEDE CRA is to develop the capability to design, optimize, and fabricate material systems exhibiting revolutionary performance in extreme dynamic environments. The approach is to realize a mechanism-based, “materials-by-design” capability that focuses on advancing the fundamental understanding of materials in relevant high-strain-rate and high-stress regimes. Model materials in the areas of metals, ceramics, composites and polymers are being investigated to improve protection for soldiers and vehicles.

HEMI Research Highlighted at JHU’s Hopkins on the Hill Event

This past Wednesday, HEMI’s Executive Program Director Dr. Victor Nakano, along with PhD candidate Jason Parker, presented research from the Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (MEDE) program at the Hopkins on the Hill event.  Hopkins on the Hill showcases the range, value, and impact of federally funded research and programming that takes place across Johns Hopkins University.  The event took place in the US House of Representative’s Rayburn Building in Washington, DC.

The event had over 500 attendees which provided Nakano and Parker the opportunity to showcase the results of MEDE research to Congressional legislative staff and JHU senior leadership and alumni.  Parker, a Department of Defense (DoD) SMART scholar working towards his doctorate in mechanical engineering, explained how his experiments will lead to improved composites materials to better protect our soldiers.  Nakano was able to show the new protection materials created within the program to Congressman David Trone of Maryland.

The MEDE program is supported by a grant from the Department of Defense.  HEMI and the CCDC Army Research Laboratory jointly lead the MEDE collaborative research alliance which consists of 18 university and research centers across nine states, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Switzerland.

MEDE has developed a materials-by-design strategy which integrates advanced experiments, computational modeling, and synthesis and processing into a single program. Three classes of materials are being investigated: metals, ceramics, and composites. The goal of MEDE is to develop new protection materials, and new computational design codes and tools for armor applications.

To learn more about the 2019 Hopkins on the Hill event, click here.

2019 Mach Conference Showcases Fundamental Research for Materials and Structures in Extreme Environments

The 2019 Mach Conference, held last week in Annapolis, MD, brought together representatives from academia, government and industry to share their work in the field of materials, with an emphasis on advancing the fundamental science and engineering of materials and structures in extreme environments.. The conference’s plenary speakers included Dr. Benji Maruyama (Air Force Research Laboratory), Dr. Jonathan Almer (Argonne National Laboratory), Prof. Gilbert “Rip” Collins (University of Rochester), Prof. William A. Curtin (EPFL), and Dr. Dennis Dimiduk (BlueQuartz Software, LLC and The Ohio State University.)  Conference-goers attended lectures, presented on research, and socialized with their peers in the discipline.

Next year’s conference will be held on April 1-3, 2020. For more information, visit www.machconference.org.